Volleying

The volley is a very important shot in the game of doubles. You have less than half the time that you have with a ground-stroke, so it will require deep concentration and a fast reaction.

  • Hold the racket with both hands in a relaxed ‘continental’ (chopper) grip
  • The ready position for the volley is slightly different than that of a ground-stoke. Instead of the racket face being at waist height, it should be at chest level directly underneath the chin
  • The first thing to do when playing a volley is to line up the strings with the flight path of the on coming ball
  • At club level, many players do not change from their ‘ready’ open stance, especially on the forehand side. If you don’t rotate your shoulders, you will end up swatting the ball. If the shot is coming to your forehand side, partly turn your non-dominant shoulder towards the net. Do the same with your dominant shoulder on a back-hand volley
  • When volleying at the net you need very little or no back swing
  • Hold the racket at about 45º. Note that, swatting the ball into the net can result from a vertically held racket
  • On back-hand volleys, maintain holding the racket in both hands until just before playing the stroke
  • At impact with the ball, your wrist needs to be in front of the strings
  • On back-hand volleys, maintain holding the racket in both hands until just before playing the stroke
  • Keep your non-hitting hand at the same height as your hitting hand
  • Hitting a drop volley takes feel. You need to deaden the ball on the stings, almost as if you were trying to catch it on your racket. You don’t want the racket to provide too much forward momentum, so relax your wrist and let the lower edge of the racket cup the ball at impact